The Napoleonic Wars 1803-1815

Louis

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Paul Delaroche’s 1814 portrait of Napoleon at Fontainebleau. Named "Napoléon abdiquant à Fontainebleau, who represents Napoleon Bonaparte in 1814, in his chair, looking lost, pale, demoralized by the setbacks of the French campaign, about to abdicate and to be exiled to Elba.
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This video is by Lindy Beige. I just love his style. He posits a good argument that one Sir Sidney Smith was the single biggest reason for Napoleon's demise.
While you may disagree you will end up agreeing that his argument has merit. The video is just a little short of an hour, but I found every minute to be entertaining
and informative. I think you will too.
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I don't think Lindy likes Napoleon very much. I don't either.
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This video is by Lindy Beige. I just love his style. He posits a good argument that one Sir Sidney Smith was the single biggest reason for Napoleon's demise. While you may disagree you will end up agreeing that his argument has merit. The video is just a little short of an hour, but I found every minute to be entertaining and informative. I think you will too.

I don't think Lindsey likes Napoleon very much. I don't either.


Ole Lindy is quite entertaining, but his online persona is quite the Brit jingoist -- which can be quite annoying sometimes... :rolleyes:
 

Louis

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Five last British survivors of the Battle of Waterloo and the Napoleonic Wars, June 1880.
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Louis

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Breastplate of Antoine Fravreau (23) a recruit, height of 1.79 metrestruck (and quite obviously killed) by a cannonball during one of the Waterloo skirmishes. He served as a of Napoleon's heavy cavalrymen during "The Hundred Days." Heavy calvarymen, such as Antoine Favreau, played a significant role in Napoleon's victories. They would be wasted in the defeat which ended the Napoleonic Wars.
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From the Daily Mail....

"....The young soldier was a new cavalryman conscript to the French army's 4th company, 2nd Carabinier Regiment who would have had 'no more than seven days training' before his death on the battlefield.

Mr Pollard said the young soldier likely died during a series of cavalry charges, described as 'more of a slog up a muddy hill than a gallop' because of the mud, against the Duke of Wellington's centre and right lines on June 16.

The 1st and 2nd Carabinier regiments were ordered forward from the east edge of Hougoumont at around 6:30pm and were met by a barrage of 'muskets and cannon' in which Favreau was likely killed, he said.

He added the breastplate was a 'prized trophy' that was recovered before Fauveau's body was buried in a mass, unmarked grave.

And in a surprising turn of events for the era a pay book found lodged in the breastplate's padding allowing officials to identify Fauveau.

The book gave his personal details as 'long, freckled face with a large forehead, blue eyes, hooked nose & a small mouth' and revealed he was a dairyman who was due to get married."
 
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